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Unless otherwise noted, all recipes on this blog are free of gluten, peanuts, soy, corn, tomatoes, potatoes, shellfish, cane sugar, oranges, and yeast. Most recipes are also free of egg, dairy, and tree nuts (if used, reliable substitutions will be provided for these when possible). Check out my recipe index for a full list of recipes by category. 

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Entries in Recipes: Breads and Baking (41)

Saturday
May042013

Gluten-Free Pumpkin Muffins (GF, dairy-free, cane sugar-free, low sugar)

So it's not *really* spring here yet. Technically it is, but the ongoing weather proves otherwise. It was snowing out this morning! For obvious reasons, "spring" food isn't really happening yet. I yearn for pea shoots, fresh lettuces, tiny radishes, and sweet crunchy kohlrabi. But given the chilly temperatures, I'm still eating root veggies, cooked greens, etc etc etc. Geez.

Since it feels like we are moving backward through the seasons instead of forward, diving headlong back into fall, I decided to make some pumpkin muffins. They are a little autumnal for this time of year, but based on the chilly temperatures, they fit right in. Aaaaand they are gluten-free, dairy-free, and cane sugar-free. I like this recipe because it makes a muffin that isn't very sweet. You can really taste the pumpkin! I mean really, if you are looking for sugarbomb baked goods, you are reading the wrong blog. They are moist and just a little sweet, with a good balance of pumpkin flavor and spice. Nice.

Pumpkin Muffins (gluten-free, dairy-free, cane sugar-free, low sugar)

yield: 10-12 regular-size muffins 

I like this recipe because it is free of xanthan gum or other binders, and is low in sugar. This yields 10 to 12 muffins, depending on how exact you are with filling the muffin tins and how large your muffin tins are. I have not tried this using a "flax" egg or another egg-substitute. If you do, please let me know how it works for you!

Ingredients

  • 1 cup pumpkin puree
  • 2 eggs
  • 1/2 cup melted coconut oil or sunflower oil (if you are a dairy-eater, this recipe is great with melted butter too)
  • 1/3 cup water
  • 1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
  • 1/2 cup + 2 tablespoons agave nectar
  • 120 grams (1 cup) sorghum flour
  • 60 grams (1/2 cup) oat flour
  • 30 grams (1/4 cup) tapioca starch aka tapioca flour
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking powder
  • 3/4 teaspoon sea salt
  • 1 tablespoon pumpkin pie spice

Directions

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Grease a muffin tin very well or line with cute muffin papers (I like dinosaur muffin papers).

In a medium bowl, whisk together the flours, starch, baking soda, baking powder, salt, and pumpkin pie spice until mixture is light and well-mixed. Set aside.

In a large bowl with stand mixer or hand mixer, combine pumpkin, eggs, oil, water, vanilla, and Agave nectar. Mix until ingredients are smooth and well-combined. Then add dry ingredients gradually, scraping sides as you go, until mixture is just combined.

Spoon batter into the prepared muffin pan, filling about 3/4 of the way ( I like using a cookie scoop for this - easy peasy!) and place in the pre-heated oven. Bake in preheated oven for 25-30 minutes or until a toothpick inserted in the center comes out clean. Remove from oven and cool 10 minutes in pan, then remove from pan and allow to finish cooling on rack.

Store in a well-sealed container or wrapped tightly in foil or in a storage bag. These muffins freeze well and can be thawed at room temperature or on a defrost setting in the microwave.

Wednesday
Oct052011

Gluten-Free Vegan Banana Cranberry Spice Muffins and Sorghum-Millet Flour Blend

I've been on a gluten-free banana bread kick ever since I made this bread. And by "kick" I really mean it - I've made a loaf nearly every week for the last 2 1/2 months. I finally encouraged myself to depart from the loaf and venture back into the world of the muffin. Inspired by an overabundance of bananas in our fruit bowl, I came up with this tasty vegan banana muffin recipe that features one of my favorite seasonal ingredients: cranberries. No gums, only a wee bit of starch, and no refined sugars. Hooray!

Conveniently, cranberries are this month's featured ingredient for the Sweet or Savory Kitchen Challenge, hosted by Diet Dessert and Dogs blogger Ricki Heller and me. What better reason to share my muffin recipe on the blog, right? 

This recipe also features a great homemade flour blend, a mixture of sorghum, millet, white rice, and arrowroot starch (also known as arrowroot flour). Ever since Shauna posted her Gluten-Free Whole Grain Muffins and the whole grain flour mix on her blog last year, I've been making many of my baked goods with various blends of flours and absolutely loving the results. It seemed she cracked the code to making a well-balanced flour blend, and the versatility of her formula allows you to use whatever flours and starches you have on hand. Brilliant.

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Tuesday
Aug092011

Really Good Banana Bread (gluten-free, dairy-free, cane sugar-free, xanthan gum-free)

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One evening last week I dropped by my friend B's house. I found my barefoot and pregnant friend the kitchen, whipping up a loaf of banana bread adapted from the Joy of Cooking. She was substituting gluten-free flours and honey for wheat flour and sugar, and success seemed inevitable - the Joy of Cooking is so reliable and B is a fantastic baker. I had high hopes for this loaf and marveled at my excellently timed visit. As it baked, the house filled with the intoxicating smell of honey and banana and my quick bread-loving heart swooned.  

Finally, the timer beeped and B removed the loaf from the oven. Oh my, was it gorgeous! We could hardly wait for it to cool and sunk a knife into its golden, crisp crust. The bread had light and lofty crumb, and our first taste revealed a marvelously sweet and nutty flavor. Even her banana-leery husband devoured it. We polished off half the loaf, and they finished it the next day.  

Since then, I have made the bread a few times and have landed on a reliable and inarguably delicious recipe. After it cools, the bread can be sliced very thin and it holds up well to being spread with butter or nut butter. And the best part? It stays moist for days, even when simply stored on the counter wrapped in parchment. While at a picnic this past weekend, my friend April's daughter ate three thick slices, using two of them to make a strawberry and butter sandwich. That's my kind of kid.

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Sunday
Mar062011

Socca with Rosemary and Cumin (gluten-free, vegan, ACD)

socca with rosemary and cumin

Once you make socca, you'll never want to live a life without it. Socca is a thin, unleavened flatbread or pancake made from chickpea flour.  Known in Italy as farinata or cecina, this chickpea pancake was founded in Genoa and became a popular food of the Ligurian Sea coast, from Nice to Pisa. Socca couldn't be easier to make - simply chickpea flour, water, olive oil, and salt and spices. It is cooked in broiler or open oven until crisp and charred.  Socca has gained popularity all around the world; depending on where you are in the world, it might be garnished with more olive oil, salt, pepper, cumin, harissa, or even jam. 

I like it hot out of the broiler, brushed with olive oil, and sprinkled with French grey salt and freshly cracked black pepper.

Despite traveling throughout France multiple times and Italy, I've never eaten socca at the source - my experience with socca is limited to my kitchen.  For a great write up about socca, check out this post by David Leibovitz. I often default to him for just about anything, especially anything French. My default socca recipe is tweaked from the version in that post, and I think you'll love it as much as I do.  It is a great snack, especially for parties, and makes a lovely appetizer for dinners. 

This recipe is also linked to Slightly Indulgent Tuesday at Simply Sugar & Gluten-Free.

socca with rosemary and cuminsocca with rosemary and cumin

Socca with Rosemary and Cumin

yield 5-6 10" socca flatbreads | slightly tweaked from David Leibovitz

I adapted David's recipe slightly, adding rosemary and including a longer soaking period for the chickpea flour with a little acid to help break down the phytic acid in the chickpeas and make it more easily digested. 

If you are concerned about heating olive oil to the temperature required in a broiler, feel free to use ghee or another high temperature oil of your choice. Using melted ghee creates a wonderful, rich nutty flavor - but I often use olive oil, to be honest. I'm willing to take a few free radicals here and there, especially for something as tasty as socca. 

  • 2 cups chickpea flour
  • 2 cups + 1/4 cup water
  • optional: 1 tsp raw apple cider vinegar, raw coconut vinegar, whey, or lemon juice
  • 1 1/2 tsp sea salt
  • 2 tsp dry rosemary leaves, lightly crushed
  • 1/2 tsp ground cumin
  • 5 Tbsp olive oil, divided
  • freshly-ground black pepper, plus additional sea salt and olive oil for serving

Mix together the flour, 2 cups water, and acidic medium, and whisk until totally smooth. Let batter rest for 8-12 hours lightly covered with a towel at room temperature (on the counter is perfect!). It will begin to bubble slightly and become lighter and airier. Then whisk in salt, cumin, rosemary, remaining 1/4 cup water, and 2 1/2 tablespoons of the olive oil.

socca with rosemary and cumin

To cook, heat the broiler in your oven. Oil a 9- or 10-inch (23cm) pan with 1 Tbsp olive oil and heat the pan in the oven.  I used my 10" cast iron skillet, which worked perfectly.

Once the pan and the oven are blazing-hot, remove from the broiler, pour enough batter into the pan to cover the bottom, swirl it around, then pop it back in the oven. Thinner batter yields a lighter, crisper socca than heavily applied batter.

Bake until the socca is firm and beginning to blister and burn. The exact time will depend on your broiler.

socca with rosemary and cumin

Slide the socca out of the pan onto a cutting board, slice into pieces (I use a pizza cutter!), then shower it with coarse salt, pepper, and a drizzle of olive oil.

Cook the remaining socca batter the same way, adding a teaspoon or two of oil to the pan and heating it slightly again in the broiler before adding the batter and cooking.

Friday
Dec172010

Buckwheat Banana Bread (gluten-free, vegan, low sugar)

IMG_0128

After a wild winter storm that dumped nearly 20" of snow upon the streets of Minneapolis in one day, I needed to feel cozy. I wanted to bake. And immediately, I thought of banana bread. Truthfully, I can't take credit for the idea - I was influenced by one of my most favorite blogs, My New Roots.  Sarah wrote a lovely post that discusses the Danish interest in hygge, the concept of being cozy, and her amazingly cozy recipe for Banana Bread. I have always loved the notion of hygge (perhaps my Danish ancestry makes me predisposed?), and was giddy to see her writing about it, especially in relationship to a lovely bread recipe.So, I found my way into the kitchen - where I spent most of last weekend - and made a batch of this lovely bread.  Sarah's culinary style is right up my alley, so I didn't need to do much to tweak the bread. I made the recipe gluten-free, using freshly ground flours, and made a few other small changes, but kept the spirit true to the original.

The result was lovely. It is sweet, but not too sweet. It is dense but still has a well-defined crumb. It is moist, but not gummy. It is flavorful and soft and chewy and makes me feel cozy inside. I really like this bread. And the bread stored well at room-temperature for almost 4 days (I don't believe it lasted that long). We all agreed it was best toasted or warmed up, but it was also good eaten plain.  I think it would make great french toast.  My housemate Mike (a guy who can eat everything) said, "This is good. Can I have another slice?" while chewing the last bite of a warm slice. He promptly returned from the kitchen with more, and ate it up. Over the next few days, we devoured the loaf, eating it slightly toasted, smeared with ghee. So good! My grain-free eating plan went totally out the window when the temperatures started diving toward the 0º F mark.  

I like to grind my flours fresh for the best flavor and freshness. For this recipe, the bulk of the flour is freshly ground hulled buckwheat groats and freshly ground millet.  If you've never baked with freshly ground buckwheat flour made from buckwheat groats, you're missing out. It has all the same great texture as regular dark buckwheat flour, but with a lighter, more neutral flavor and a light tan color. Regular buckwheat flour is made from buckwheat groats that still have the dark hull, which lend a dark color. When you grind hulled groats, you get light buckwheat flour. Pretty cool, right? Freshly ground millet flour is no different than what you'd buy in stores, except that it tastes better and is fresher.

I use a Vitamix to grind my flours. You can also use another high-powered blender like a Blendtech, a grain mill, a coffee or spice grinder, or perhaps a really good high-quality regular blender. Just grind until you have a fine powder, like flour. Done!

I think you'll really like this bread. It made me feel cozy inside and out, and filled the house with a warm, lovely smell that made us all smile. Winter is totally bearable with food like this around, isn't it?

Oh, and one more thing...

I'm starting a monthly newsletter! I think it will be fun. Sign up here, and I'll start sending out newsletters in January 2011. It's free and should be lots of fun. I plan to include all sorts of unique information, tips, featured foods, and a recipe each month. So sign up!

This post is linked to Slightly Indulgent Tuesday for 1/11/11 on Simply Sugar & Gluten-Free. Yay!

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