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Gluten-free, allergy-friendly, whole foods recipes

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Unless otherwise noted, all recipes on this blog are free of gluten, peanuts, soy, corn, tomatoes, potatoes, shellfish, cane sugar, oranges, and yeast. Most recipes are also free of egg, dairy, and tree nuts (if used, reliable substitutions will be provided for these when possible). Check out my recipe index for a full list of recipes by category. 

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Entries in Recipes: Condiments/Sauces/Stocks (36)

Saturday
Aug072010

Spicy Niter Kibbeh (Ethiopian Spiced Ghee) (gluten-free, vegetarian, ACD, casein-free)

IMG_3358

Okay, I just need to get this out there first: this photo is totally killing me. There is something Hitchcockian about that shadow in the upper right corner that feels a little ominous.  And the hard light, color of the ghee, and the slightly grainy quality of the image reminds me of those gross-looking old 1970s cookbooks.  It's like a film noire movie and my parents' old cookbooks had a bastard child!  The color in all of these photos is a bit wonky, but that's what I get for taking photos in my dimly lit apartment at night. I should know better. Moving on.

Last year I saw that Pure Indian Foods, makers of a wonderful grass-fed, organic ghee, make a variety of herbal and spice infused ghees.  I was in Portland at a food co-op, and wanted to buy one of each variety. Knowing I had limited suitcase space, I didn't purchase any of them, and decided I needed to try making my own. Well, one thing led to another, life happened, yadda yadda yadda, and I just never got around to making a batch. But those ghees have been dancing around in the back of my mind like little sugarplums dancing around on the night before Christmas.

giving my spice rack a little workout 

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Tuesday
Jul272010

How to Make Ghee 

I've been meaning to write this post for almost 2 years. Why so long? Writing the how-to with step-by-step photos is significantly more time consuming and complicated than making ghee!  The pieces just never really came together. Finally, I remembered to grab a camera while making my most recent batch, so I set to work.

Now, without further adieu, here is the skinny on ghee and a complete set of instructions on how to make it from scratch, with photos to help you along the way.  Enjoy!

 

What is Ghee?

Also known as butter oil (or in my house, liquid gold), ghee is pure butter fat that has been separated from the milk proteins through heating.  To clarify (ba-dum-ching!), clarified butter and ghee are not the same, despite popular opinion. Ghee is clarified butter that has been cooked longer to remove all the moisture, and the milk solids are browned (caramelized) in the fat and then strained out. This gives a rich nutty taste and fragrance, with hints of caramel, and a smooth, rich, velvety texture.  It can be used 1:1 for butter, shortening, or oil in any recipe, and has a high smoking point, making it perfect for high heat sauteing or roasting. Ghee has a long shelf life, both refrigerated and at room temperature. In cold temperatures, it will become solid, and it will remain liquid at warmer temperatures.

Because dairy proteins and lactose have been removed, many dairy intolerant and allergic people are able to tolerate ghee.  It is traditionally used in Indian cuisine and Ayurvedic medicine, and is treasured as a digestive stimulant. It can also be used topically for massage or dry skin.  

If you want to purchase pre-made ghee, Pure Indian Foods and Purity Farms are both excellent.  However, these will put a dent in your wallet - a 14 oz jar will cost you between $10 - $15.  If you want to save some major dollar, you can make the same amount of homemade ghee for the cost of a pound of good butter and a little time, and save yourself half the cost.  Okay, let's get cooking!

 good butter is the perfect place to start

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Sunday
Jun202010

Fresh, local, and gluten-free: two farmer's market fresh recipes

Purple kohlrabi and Cultured Kohlrabi "Pickles"

I had quite the day yesterday at the Minneapolis Farmers Market.  I kicked it all off at 8 am on the Fresh & Local Show as a guest.  I was on the Fresh & Local Show last summer and was so flattered to be asked back for another show.  The Fresh & Local Show is sponsored by the Minnesota Vegetable Grower's Association, and features weekly guests to talk about gardening, seasonal produce, and the farmers market. Susan Berkson and Bonnie Dehn, the joyful and knowledgeable hosts, are so much fun, and I loved being able to spend time with them talking about food, gardening, and cooking. As it turned out, one of the other guests, Mary Maguire Lehrman, also has chronic Lyme Disease, so we even got to do a little educating about Lyme.  

The radio program will be available to download online early this week, so check out this link and look for the dated broadcasts if you want to listen! 

After the broadcast, we all sat down and shared in a wonderful fresh fruit tart that I made.  It was covered in fresh fruit, including red currants I picked from my garden, had a rich cashew lemon cream filling, and a lovely oatmeal and coconut flour crust. I'll post the recipe eventually.  In the meantime, feast your eyes!

fresh fruit tart...you'll get the recipe eventually, i promise

Then I hopped in my car and drove to the Minneapolis Farmers Market. I threw on my apron and led my very first live cooking demo for the weekly Market Talk in a segment called "Fresh, Local, and Gluten-Free".  It was so much fun! I used fresh market produce to demonstrate two recipes: Cultured Kohlrabi Dill Pickles and Sauteed Zucchini with Garlic Scape Spinach Pesto.  I also shared hints and suggestions for creating allergy-friendly meals using fresh food from the market and pantry staples.  It was a yummy seasonal food extravaganza!  Everyone watching the demo got to sample my creations.  The crowd loved it - even the fermented pickles!  People really enjoyed the demonstration and were very engaged, and I had a good, consistent crowd through the whole hour-long demonstration.

I was thankful to have two great event organizers, Sandy Hill and Rachele Cermak, to help out that day, serving up samples and prompting me with questions and discussion points. It made my first demonstration much easier to do!   I was happy to see Sandy licking leftover pesto off her fingers after cleaning out the food processor.  Neither of them believed that it was my first time doing a live demonstration, and told me I should have a cooking show, which made me blush. They were very flattering! I think I may be doing another demonstration at the market this fall, so stay tuned! 

Sauteed zucchini with garlic scape and spinach pesto

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Tuesday
Jun082010

Sugar-Free Strawberry Rhubarb Jam (gluten free, vegan, ACD option) 

I saw the most frighteningly gorgeous strawberries at the farmers market last weekend. They were perfect - vibrantly red, plump, shiny, local, and organic. You could smell them from 5 feet away (no kidding).  These berries had the perfume of summer and sunshine and all things gorgeous and amazing.


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Saturday
May012010

Pesto di Carciofi - Artichoke Pesto (gluten-free, casein-free, vegan option, ACD)

Artichokes!  What a puzzler!  Artichokes are this month's Blogger Secret Ingredient, and I'm the host. I already posted one artichoke recipe, but I wanted to make another one using the fresh artichokes from my crisper! They were what inspired me to choose artichokes for these week's ingredient, after all, and they have been bangin' around that drawer for way too long.  So, out they came. 

I most often prepare artichokes by trimming them and steaming them, scraping their little leaves with my teeth, and then greedily eating the heart.  This time I wanted to try something totally different.  I consulted my favorite cookbook of late, the River Cafe Cook Book Green.  It is a rustic, seasonal Italian cookbook written by two British women, Ruth Rogers and Rose Gray. If any cuisine knows how to use artichokes, it Italian cuisine, and Ruth and Rose really capture the spirit of Italian cooking. Just ask Jamie Oliver - he cut his teeth working at the River Cafe back in his days as a young chef. Dreamy!

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