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Unless otherwise noted, all recipes on this blog are free of gluten, peanuts, soy, corn, tomatoes, potatoes, shellfish, cane sugar, oranges, and yeast. Most recipes are also free of egg, dairy, and tree nuts (if used, reliable substitutions will be provided for these when possible). Check out my recipe index for a full list of recipes by category. 

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Entries in Recipes: Desserts & Sweets (51)

Sunday
Mar212010

Sugar-free, Allergy-free Easter Candy: Choco-Coco Nests and Fudge Sunny Bunnies (dairy free, gluten free, ACD, vegan)

A couple weeks ago I woke up dreaming about Easter candy.  

You know you spend too much time in the kitchen when you dream about food.

To be perfectly honest, I've never been huge for candy.  Jelly beans? Meh (except the black ones). Hard candy? No thanks (except root beer barrels). Licorice? Sorry, no (except real black licorice). Gummy candy? I'll pass (except for sour patch kids...and those sour gummy worms).  

Hmn. Maybe I like candy more than I thought.

But chocolate? No question. I LOVE CHOCOLATE.  And for that reason, I loved Easter.

My childhood Easter baskets certainly contained Cadbury eggs and jelly beans, but the real stars of the basket came from a little chocolate shop in my hometown of Oshkosh, Wisconsin called Hughes Home Maid Chocolates.  Every year their handmade milk coconut nests, chocolate pudding eggs, and chocolate rabbits graced our beautifully decorated baskets. My brother and I were very lucky children, and we each received multiple baskets every year that the Easter Bunny hid all over the house and garage. Our bunny was a very sneaky bunny, and we often had to ask for hints.  

Click to read more ...

Wednesday
Feb242010

Take that, McDonald's: Dairy-Free Avocado Shamrock Shake (gluten free, vegan, ACD)

 

I went to McDonald's.

It's not what you think.

Every day on the bus, I pass a McDonald's.  Sometimes I end up waiting at the bus stop in front of the McDonalds.  The smell makes me queasy.  I really dislike McDonalds.  I think it is disgusting, and have thought so for a long long long time.  I turned on McDonalds after going veg at 14, and I think I've probably eaten at McDonald's less than 5 times since then.  My last meal there was an egg McMuffin my junior year of college, a very reluctant event that occurred out of absolute necessity in the desolate dietary wasteland of Moorehead, MN on a college trip with a music group.  I am not an advocate of McDonald's.

Anyway, earlier this week, I noticed that McDonald's had changed the sign under the golden arches to read "Shamrock Shakes $2.99".  Despite my disgust for the general establishment, I could taste the minty goodness in my mouth.  I used to be quite the sucker for seasonal ice creams - pumpkin shakes in the fall, shamrock shakes for St. Patrick's day. I have always loved mint ice cream, and Shamrock Shakes, as a child, were a nice treat. Never mind the inevitable stomachache - I loved those things.  In that very moment, I desperately wanted a Shamrock Shake. The golden arches were tempting me. I started obsessing over how I could make a dairy-free, sugar-free replica.  It took over my brain.  I had an idea, something that involved avocado, mint leaves, and ice.  Yes. This would work.  

When the bus stopped across from McDonald's yesterday, and I saw the sign again, I was overcome.  I got up, I got off the bus, I crossed the street, and I walked in to the McDonalds.  Yes, you heard me - I went in. My nostrils were filled the heavy smell of french fries.  I went to the counter.  I ordered.

Click to read more ...

Monday
Dec212009

Gluten-Free Holiday Recipes: Dairy Free Black Bean Fudge (gluten free, vegan, ACD-friendly)


Fudge was always one of my favorite features of the holiday dessert platter.  And thanks to this recipe, fudge can now reclaim its position as one of my most favorite indulgences.

Dairy free, gluten free, sugar free, full of protein, and even packing a punch of fiber, this fudge is totally guilt-free - not to mention creamy, rich, and delicious.  Like, melt in your mouth creamy and delicious.  What's the secret?  Black beans, high quality cocoa and/or carob flour, and coconut oil!  But it tastes nothing like beans, I promise.  Coconut oil provides a ton of beneficial fatty acids, antioxidants, and lauric acid, a natural anti-microbial agent.  Because it is solid at room temperature,  it is perfect for setting up the fudge!  Besides being delicious, this recipe couldn't be easier to make - just throw everything in a blender or food processor, and go to town.  DONE!

Speaking of coconut oil, I had been using the inexpensive organic 365 Brand coconut oil from Whole Foods until last week, when cracked open my first jar of Wilderness Family Naturals coconut oil.  What a difference!  The Wilderness coconut oil had a light, creamy texture, and an incredible flavor; this is a seriously superior oil.  In the spirit of exploration, I plan on trying the Nutiva brand coconut oil next.  What about you - what's your favorite coconut oil?

This fudge is perfect for the holiday treat table at work parties and family get-togethers.   Don't tell them it is made of beans... see if they notice!  I plan on making another version of it this week for my family holiday week of fun, maybe with a swirl of Sunbutter, so keep your eyes peeled for more fudge recipes.

ACD note: If you are on the ACD and tolerate carob and/or cocao powder, this fudge is a great choice for you.  I used a little agave nectar in combination with stevia (I really like the combo of the two!), but  the agave can easily be omitted and substituted with more stevia.  You can't mess it up!

BLACK BEAN FUDGE 

yield: 24 pieces

1 15-oz can cooked black beans, drained and rinsed (about 1 3/4 cups)
1/4 cup + 2 Tbsp melted coconut oil (ghee or butter could also be substituted) 
3/4 cup carob powder, cocoa powder, or mix (I like using half-and-half)
2 tsp vanilla extract
1-4 Tbsp agave nectar, brown rice syrup, honey, maple syrup, or coconut nectar, to taste 
1/4-1/2 tsp stevia extract powder, to taste 
pinch sea salt (I like using Maldon salt flakes - pretty and tasty!) 

Put all ingredients (except salt) in high-powered blender (like a VitaMix) or food processor and process until totally smooth. I do not recommend using a normal blender, because mixture will be very thick and really hard to process.

Line an 8"x4" loaf pan with saran wrap, or place saran wrap on a plate, and transfer fudge mixture to pan, pressing down firmly.  If forming on a plate, form a rectangle and smooth edges as much as possible. Sprinkle with a little bit of coarsely ground sea salt.  Place in the refrigerator, and let set for at least 1 hour, or until totally firm.  Slice into 24 squares (approx 1" squares), and serve!

Store in the refrigerator for up to 5-6 days (but it won't last that long!!!).  For longer storage, cut fudge squares can be frozen, and defrosted in the refrigerator or at room temperature until thawed.  DO NOT microwave the frozen fudge to defrost it unless you want fudge sauce; the oil will melt!

VARIATION:
Mint fudge: add 1/2-1 tsp mint extract along with other ingredients, and blend as directed
Nutty fudge: add 2-4 Tbsp chopped nuts to mixture after blending or substitute 1-2 Tbsp of coconut oil with nut/seed butter

Saturday
Dec192009

Whole Life Nutrition's Amazing Chocolate Chip Cookies (gluten free, vegan, sugar-free)

 

I've had a totally inappropriate urge for chocolate chip cookies lately.  Part of it, of course, is seasonal - this time of year just CALLS for baking.  But part of it because my sweets cravings are a little out of control.  After getting the Lyme diagnosis six weeks ago and dealing with some added financial and emotional stress, I totally fell off the anti-Candida diet wagon.  It's  not like I started eating straight up cane sugar or anything, or even using a ton of sweetener.  But I certainly started indulging more than usual in sweet stuff and starchy stuff.  Tasty baked goods, homemade pumpkin pie, sunflower cacao fudge, black bean fudge, that amazaké, lots of squash and roasted beets, general overeating...the list goes on...and on...and on....

 Accordingly, my pants are a little tight, I feel fat, and I'm pretty sure that Candida I was having issues with before are back in full swing.

Damn it!  What am I DOING?!  Seriously, where did all that self-restraint and control go?  I think I used it all up last year.  I need to find it again.

Anyway, despite all this, I made cookies not all that long ago.  I was invited to a Holiday Cookie Party, and just couldn't help myself.  My compulsive urge to bake overtook me, and I fell prey to an amazing looking cookie recipe on the Whole Life Nutrition blog.  After meeting great success with a variation on a millet muffin recipe from their cookbook earlier this week, I had decided to make a cookie recipe from the book for this party.  But when I saw this recipe for chocolate chip cookies on their blog, I knew I had to do it: no gluten, vegan, no flour or binders or starches.  A high protein cookie using quinoa flakes and ground nuts and nut butter.  What?!?!? It sounded too good to be true.  I wanted to try it. I needed to try it.  Well okay, not really, but it sure felt like it.

So, I made a few tweaks.   I baked the dough.  The toasty tasty smell while they baked was truly magnificent.  Plus, the extra heat from the oven was a real treat in my chilly apartment.   Then I removed them from the oven, let one cool a little, and tasted it.  Holy crap.  Then I let it cool completely, and finished it off.  This cookie was like a real, bonafide cookie.  The best cookie I have eaten - by FAR - in over a year and half.  Chewy in the middle, crisp on the outside, rich and sweet and flavorful.  Awesome.

Ali, you rock my world. 


Ali's original recipe is posted HERE.  I made the following changes:

  • used 1/2 cup pitted deglet noor dates instead of medjool dates, probably about 12 of them
  • substituted 1/4 cup coconut oil with 1/4 cup grapeseed oil
  • substituted 1/4 cup honey with 1/4 cup rice milk and 1 tsp stevia extract powder
  • substituted mini chocolate chips with 1/2 cup finely chopped Ghiradelli unsweetened chocolate
  • substituted almond butter and almond meal with 1 cup cashew butter and 1/2 cup ground cashews 
  • baked 14-16 minutes instead of 10-12
Okay, I know the unsweetened chocolate sounds weird. Let me explain: the intense and bitter flavor totally works for me, especially when combined with something just a little sweet.  So, I think it is perfect in these cookies; the sweet flavor from the dates and stevia counteracts the bitterness of the unsweetened chocolate, providing a rich and appealing flavor combination, a lot like dark chocolate.  No one that ate these cookies guessed it was unsweetened chocolate - seriously, they all thought they were dark chocolate chips.  You could also use store-bought carob or chocolate chips (Enjoy Life makes a vegan, soy free chocolate chip, but it has can juice), raw cacao nibs, or make your own carob or chocolate chips - it's easy!  Go the bottom of this post for a homemade carob chip recipe that will make your day.  I shouldn't even be eating chocolate.  But again, I just couldn't resist.

Next time I think I will also reduce the amount of oil; I think that 2 T oil might cut it, with a couple extra tablespoons rice milk.  I think it would make the cookie just a little lighter.  I'd also like to try the recipe with Sunbutter and ground sunflower seeds.

This recipe is a winner!  Everyone that tried them at the cookie party really like them, honestly.  The texture was wonderful; dense, chewy, soft, not at all crumbly or grainy or sandy like GF cookies can be sometimes.  They stayed tender and chewy. I froze part of the batch, and was thrilled how well they thawed - and how delicious they were frozen, actually.


Anyway, I just finished off the last ones a couple days ago, and will probably make a batch for the holidays. Then I have to take a serious break from all this cookie business.    Once I start antibiotics in a couple weeks, I really need to be super careful about the sugar - long-term antibiotic use aggravates Candida big time, and I've already got issues.  That road will be rocky.  At least I was enjoying these cookies in the meantime, for better or worse...

When I finally decide to stop eating these slightly cheaty foods, I have an excellent place to turn: Ricki, from the wonderful blog Diet, Dessert, and Dogs, just published her Anti-Candida Feast e-book!  I bought my copy last night, and you can be sure I'll be trying out some of the wonderful sounding recipes!  Some of them need some tweaking to fit with my allergies, but it is full of inspirational, healthy, and TOTALLY ACD-friendly food.  Leave it to Ricki - she is a wonder woman!

 

 

Sunday
Nov222009

Gluten Free Holiday Recipes: Wild Lentil Loaf, Parsnip Gravy, Amazaké Pumpkin Custard with Apple Cider Gelée, Quinoa-Wild Rice Stuffing, and more!

Hooray for Thanksgiving!  Hooray for gluten free, allergy-friendly holiday food!

Holiday time is always the hardest for those of us with dietary restrictions, right?  Well, no fear.  Here are some of my favorite recipes that are just right for holiday get-togethers, from tasty goodies for the appetizer table to delicious gravy and to a sugar free, gluten free, vegan pumpkin pie.  A handful are new, but most are pulled from the archives.   Christmas will be big this year with a lot of family coming to Minneapolis, so expect Round 2 closer to Christmas!  In the meantime, enjoy these!

All recipes follow the following restrictions:
  • gluten free
  • soy free
  • corn free
  • egg free
  • dairy free (ghee may be used occasionally, sub oil of choice, and might be used yogurt used in a few older recipes)
  • cane sugar free
  • peanut free
  • yeast free
  • potato free
  • citrus free
  • tomato free
  • vegan/vegetarian (with exception of dairy)
Appetizers & Snacks
Wild Lentil Loaf  - NEW! see recipe below 
 
Vegetable Sides

Lacto-fermented vegetables 
These are perfect for a relish tray and help aid digestion of heavy meals.

Stuffing/Dressing a.k.a. CARB FEAST
Wild Rice & Quinoa Pilaf  - NEW! see recipe below
Waffle Stuffing: dice up waffles and use them like bread cubes in any traditional stuffing recipe! Sprouted Quinoa Millet Waffles,  Savory Wild Rice Millet Waffles with Garlic and Rosemar

Gravy
Sugar Free Pumpkin Pie with Crunchy Crust and Cashew Whipped Cream
Amazaké Pumpkin Custard with Apple Cider Gelée - NEW! see recipe below
Apple Pear Streusal Cake
Plum Apricot Tart (substitute apples, pears, or cranberries instead of plums and apricots!)
 
 
Wild Lentil Loaf

Wild Lentil Loaf

yield 1 large pan, approx 6-8 servings

This looks like a lot of instructions, but it really is easy!  Rice and lentils can be made 1-2 days in advance if necessary.   Mixture can be assembled and refrigerated for up to 24 hours before baking.  A make-ahead miracle!  The texture is very moist, but is sliceable and delicious covered with parsnip gravy.  Leftovers are awesome hot or cold.
1 1/4 c dry red lentils
1 bay leaf
2 garlic cloves, minced
1 c dry wild rice/brown rice mix, soaked 6-8 hours OR 2 cups cooked
1 c brown rice flakes, quinoa flakes, GF oats, or GF bread crumbs (I used brown rice flakes)
1 handful brown rice flour + 2 T brown rice flour
1/2 large red onion, finely chopped
2 stalks celery, finely chopped
2 medium carrots, peeled and grated
1 parsnip, peeled and grated (or one additional carrot)
1/2 bunch Italian flat leaf parsley, chopped
1 T dry thyme
1 T dry rosemary
1 tsp marjoram
1 tsp cumin seeds
2 T flax seed meal + 1/3 c water
sea salt and fresh black pepper to taste
olive oil
a couple handfuls raw sunflower seeds, toasted
2 T brown rice flour or other GF flour for dusting
  1. Rinse rice and soak for 6-8 hours.  Rinse, then cook per desired method.   I used a pressure cooker (2 cups water for 20 minutes at 15 lbs pressure).  
  2. Pick through and rinse lentils.  Cook the lentils on a stove top with 2 1/2 c water, the bay leaf, and minced garlic for about 15 minutes, or until lentils are totally tender and water is fully absorbed, stirring occasionally to prevent burning.  Remove bay leaf.  
  3. Preheat oven to 375* F.  Oil a 2.5-3 qt square or rectangular dish and dust with 2 T of rice flour.
  4. In a microwave or on the stovetop, heat water and flaxmeal until a thick and gooey gel forms (1-2 minutes).  Stir vigorously with a fork a few times, then let cool completely.
  5. Toast sunflower seeds in a dry sauté pan over medium heat until golden and fragrant.  Remove from heat, and set aside to cool.
  6. Add olive oil to the saucepan, and heat over medium-high.  Add cumin seeds and sauté until fragrant, then add onion and celery, and saute for a few minutes. Then add carrot and parsnip and saute for an additional 10 minutes, or until vegetables are soft and fully cooked.  Add a little broth or water and cover if you notice the mixture is getting dry or cooking slowly.  Remove from heat.
  7. Mix 2 cups of rice, the lentils, and flax goo in a large bowl until smooth. Put 1 cup of rice/lentil mixture and half the sauteed vegetables in a blender and puree until smooth, and return to the bowl.
  8. Add the rest of the vegetables and all the remaining ingredients and stir, adding salt and pepper to taste.  Mixture should be super thick.  
  9. Pack the mixture firmly into pan, and then sprinkle with sunflower seeds. At this point, you can bake immediately, or cover and refrigerate for up to 24 hours before baking.  If you let it sit, the flour and flakes absorb the moisture and the loaf sets very well.  
  10. Bake covered for about 45 minutes at 375* F, then uncover and let bake for about 15 minutes, until top is crisp and sunflower seeds are golden brown.  NOTE: if you had it in the fridge and it went in the oven very cold, it may take longer to bake and get warm.  

Parsnip Gravy

yield 3 cups

This gravy benefits from the rich flavor and velvety texture of pureed parsnip and onions.  Serve on lentil loaf, over cooked grains or veggies, or on top of mashed cauliflower or potatoes.

3 parsnips, peeled and thinly sliced
1/2 medium onion, finely diced
3-4 c broth/stock or water, divided
2 T olive oil
2 T sweet rice flour, white rice flour, or millet flour
salt and pepper to taste
optional: itty bitty pinch of nutmeg
  1. Peel parsnips and thinly slice.  Steam until tender, then put in blender.
  2. While parsnips steam, saute onions in a saucepan with a little olive oil over medium heat until browned and tender.  Put in blender with steamed parsnips.  heat about 1/2 c broth in the saucepan until simmering, swirl around, and pour into blender.  Puree until smooth.
  3. Heat 2 T olive oil in the saucepan, warm over medium heat, then add flour and stir.  Cook until flour starts to brown and smells nutty, then gradually add about 2 c broth, whisking constantly.  Bring to a scald, then reduce heat.  Gravy should start to thicken.  Simmer for a couple of minutes, stirring regularly to prevent burning.   
  4. Add pureed parsnip mixture and whisk until smooth.   Simmer a couple of minutes, adding more broth as necessary to reach desired consistency and stirring often.  Season to taste with salt, pepper, and if desired, just an itty bitty pinch of nutmeg.
  5. Serve warm drizzled over lentil loaf, or use on cooked grains, steamed vegetables, or anything else!

Wild rice and quinoa create a chewy, wonderful texture for a pilaf


Wild Rice & Quinoa Pilaf Stuffing

serves 8-10

This stuffing uses whole grains instead of bread, but is still full of all the same delicious flavor.  Stuff inside a bird, or serve on the side - either way, it is sure to satisfy.
3/4 c wild rice
3/4 c quinoa
water for soaking
water/broth for cooking
1-2 T extra virgin olive oil
1 1/2 c carrot, grated
3/4 c celery, thinly sliced
10 scallions, thinly sliced
1/3 c fresh parsley, minced
1 T dry thyme
1 T dry rosemary, crushed
1/2 tsp coriander
1/2 tsp garlic powder
1/8 tsp allspice
salt and pepper to taste
optional: handful toasted nuts/seeds
optional: handful dried fruit (apricots, currants, raisins)
optional: diced apple
optional: 1-2 T maple syrup
  1. Place quinoa and wild rice in separate bowls with 3x as much water as grain.  Soak for 6-12 hours. 
  2. Rinse grains (rub quinoa together while rinsing) and drain.  
  3. Cook wild rice: I like to cook wild rice in a rice cooker or pressure cooker.  If using a rice cooker,  cook as directed in your owner's manual.  If using a pressure cooker, follow directions for rice.  I cooked mine for 15 minutes at 5 lbs pressure, placing wild rice grains and 1 1/2 c water in an oiled pan, and placing the pan and 2 c water in the cooker. If cooking in a saucepan on the stovetop, add 2 c water and rice to pan, bring to a boil, cover and reduce to a simmer.  Cook until all water is absorbed and grains are tender.  Remove from heat and let steam about 10 minutes, then fluff with a fork.
  4. Cook quinoa: Place quinoa in a saucepan, add 1 1/2 c water/broth, bring to a boil, then cover and reduce to a simmer.  Cook for about 15 minutes, or until all water has been absorbed.  Turn off heat let sit covered for about 10 minutes.  Remove cover and fluff grains with a fork.
  5. Peel and grate carrot, thinly slice celery, and thinly slice scallion.  If using apple, peel, core, and finely chop.  
  6. Heat oil in a large saute pan.  Saute celery for 1-2  minutes, then add carrots, scallions, and chopped apple (if using), and saute until everything is tender.  Add spices and stir to coat.
  7. Add cooked grains to pan, stirring to mix, and heat mixture over medium heat until evenly warmed through.  Cover and add a little extra broth or water if mixture is getting dry.  
  8. Serve warm.  If desired, sprinkle with toasted nuts/seeds or a handful of dried fruit before serving. 


This dessert has a crystal clear layer of apple cider gelée - beautiful!


Pumpkin Amazaké Custard with Apple Cider Gelée

yield 1 9" round custard, approximately 8-12 servings

This dessert looks elegant, tastes amazing, and is incredibly easy to make.  As always, it is gluten free, egg free, dairy free, and soy free, but there's also no added sugar and it is low in fat.   A layer of apple cider gelée adds a special twist, but the custard can be served just as well without, if desired.  The perfect allergy-friendly dessert that all your guests will enjoy!

Custard
1 c amazaké base + 1 c milk substitute OR 2 cups Grainnaissance Amazake Shake OR 2 cups grain puree (see NOTES below)
2 T arrowroot starch + 4 T milk substitute
2 tsp agar agar powder OR 4 T agar agar flakes
2 c cooked pumpkin or squash, packed (I used butternut!)
1/4-1/2 tsp stevia extract powder (start with less, then add more to taste if desired)
1 T coconut oil, grapeseed oil, or other light tasting oil
1/2 vanilla bean, split and scraped OR 1/4 tsp vanilla powder OR 1 tsp GF vanilla extract
1 T mesquite flour, 1/4 tsp allspice, 1/4 tsp cardamom OR 3/4 tsp cinnamon, 3/4 tsp ginger, 1/4 tsp nutmeg
1/4 tsp salt

Cider Gelée (do not serve with gelée if on strict ACD)
1 1/2 c apple cider or apple juice
3/4 tsp agar agar powder OR 1 1/2 T agar agar flakes
Make the custard:
  1. Puree amazaké and milk/water in blender until totally smooth.  Strain mixture into a saucepan through a fine sieve to remove any unblended chunks, and set aside.
  2. Put 2 cups of cooked squash in the blender, along with oil, spices, salt, and vanilla, and set aside.
  3. Sprikle agar flakes/powder over amazaké in saucepan, and heat to a simmer over medium heat without stirring.  Then simmer for two minutes, stirring gently until agar is totally dissolved.  Dissolve the arrowroot in 4 T cold milk substitute, and add it to the amazaké mixture.  It will thicken immediately -simmer 1-2 more minutes, stirring constantly.  Mixture will be VERY thick.
  4. Immediately transfer amazaké mixture into blender, and puree all ingredients until smooth.
  5. Pour into an 9" x 1 1/2" round tart/flan/cake pan with a drop bottom or a springform pan.  If your pan is not non-stick, lightly oil the sides of the pan before pouring it in.   Smooth top with a spoon or rubber spatula, and drop pan lightly on counter top a few times to remove air bubbles.  Let sit in a level place for about 30 minutes.  If serving custard without layer of gelée, transfer to refrigerator, let chill 4 hours, then serve.  If serving with gelée...
While it sets, make the gelée:
  1. Pour cider into a small saucepan and sprinkle agar agar powder/flakes over the top.  Heat to a simmer without stirring, then stir and simmer for about 2 minutes, or until agar is totally dissolved. 
  2. Add vanilla if using, and stir again to mix.  Pour into a cool bowl or measuring cup, and place in refrigerator to cool for 10 minutes.  Don't let sit too long, or it will start to set!
  3. Once it has cooled, gently pour cooled cider mixture over custard.  Let sit in level spot for about 20 minutes, then put in the fridge and chill for at least 4 hours, or up to 2 days.
To serve, remove ring, place on serving platter, and slice into wedges just before serving.  If desired, top with a blob of something creamy (whipped cream/cashew cream/coconut cream/rice cream/some other creamy thing) of your choice. It is really tasty with Coconut Bliss Coconut Milk Ice Cream!  

NOTES: 
  • If you do not have amazaké, make a grain puree:  blend 1 cup of very well cooked grain with 1 cup of milk substitute until totally smooth, straining to remove chunks.  I tried this recipe again with leftover mixed brown and wild rice blended with rice milk, and it worked great!  I would recommend using grain that has been cooked with a higher than usual amount of water so it is very soft and very well cooked.
  • If you do not have a drop bottom pan, you could make this in an pie tin, and just serve slices of it like pie.  
  • For individual servings, spoon mixture custard cups or molds and let set, and topping each serving with equal portions of cider gelée as desired.

 

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