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Gluten-free, allergy-friendly, whole foods recipes

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Unless otherwise noted, all recipes on this blog are free of gluten, peanuts, soy, corn, tomatoes, potatoes, shellfish, cane sugar, oranges, and yeast. Most recipes are also free of egg, dairy, and tree nuts (if used, reliable substitutions will be provided for these when possible). Check out my recipe index for a full list of recipes by category. 

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Entries in Seasonal Foods (56)

Monday
May022011

April SOS Kitchen Challenge Asparagus Recipe Round-Up

This past month, Ricki and I chose Asparagus as our SOS Kitchen Challenge key ingredient, and set out a true "kitchen challenge": could anyone actually come up with a (tasty) sweet asparagus-based recipe? Well, I'm thrilled to report that several of you rose to the challenge quite admirably!

The asparagus recipes flowed in all month, with many arriving down to the wire.  Here are some of the highlights (you can find links to all these recipes and more in the linky list below):

The Savory: 

Asparagus-Herb Muffins from A Dash of Compassion
Creamy Asparagus Pasta from Vegan Awakening
Spring Salad with Asparagus and Fresh Corn from The Allergic Kid
Simple Chilled Asparagus Salad from The Gluten-Free Edge
Brown Rice Risotto with Asparagus from City/Life/Eats

. . .and The Sweet! (kudos to all of you for these incredibly creative dishes):

Tropical Purple Smoothie from Glow
Asparagus Muffins with Cashew Cream Frosting from Cara's Cravings
Asparagus-Orange Quick Bread from B & The Boy

All of your recipes look sensational!

Thanks to everyone who participated this past month.  We were thrilled with every one of your 22 entries. 

Ricki and I are currently putting the finishing touches on the kickoff post for May. . . a favorite ingredient that is used frequently on both our blogs.  And we're certain that everyone, wherever you're located, can participate equally this month. Stayed tuned for the annoucement in a day or two.  

April SOS Kitchen Challenge Submissions: Asparagus


Wednesday
Apr202011

Rutabaga raab and other fresh food finds in Washington

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I just returned from 6 days visiting friends in Washington state. It was the perfect vacation - a balance of town and country, old friends and new, sun and rain, and lots of delicious food. I ate my way through Seattle, Port Townsend, and Woodinville, and enjoyed every last bite. One of my favorite things about traveling is food. Trying local specialties, checking out farmer's markets, cruising through co-ops, eating at independently owned restaurants - these are my favorite ways to see the heart of a community and satisfy my never-ending food curiosity. Washington is perfect for this. In addition to amazing restaurants and natural grocers and co-ops, the prevalence of road side produce stands and wild edibles makes this state like a big buffet. I saw slews of blackberry bushes and wild fennel growing along a sidewalk in Seattle for goodness sake.  And unlike the gardens here in Minnesota (which were covered in snow this morning), the gardens around Seattle are already yielding beautiful produce. 

I am resuming the planning process for moving to the Pacific Northwest.

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One of the most interesting food items I saw for sale were bunches of rutabaga raab for sale at the Port Townsend Food Co-op. Rutabaga raab is nothing more than the flowering tops and tender leaves of the rutabaga plant. I laughed when I saw the bunches being sold for $1.99 each, because I generally pick the tender leafy flowering tops from my kale and mustard plants and use them right along with the greens. But you never see these in stores, and I never thought of using rutabaga greens! Rutabaga greens are not often used, or even available, and when you do find them, they never have the tender flowering tops. Because the rutabaga is better stored without the leaves, they usually get discarded before the rutabaga even gets to market. So, rutabaga raab is really something you'd only have access to if you were growing rutabaga yourself or, apparently, if you live in Port Townsend.  

Click to read more ...

Monday
Apr112011

"April in the Raw" and recipe for Layered Rainbow Salad

Brittany at Real Sustenance is hosting a great blog event this month called April in the Raw. I was thrilled when she asked me to participate. All month long, bloggers will be posting about their experiences with raw food and sharing raw and raw inspired recipes.  Be sure to check out the April in the Raw home page to see all the posts and recipes from other participating bloggers.

Sometimes the raw food culture can seem intimidating. The soaking, the sprouting, the dehydrating, the mixing, the requisite dehydrator, the frequent expensive (and often imported) specialty ingredients - it can be overwhelming. Don't get me wrong, I'm not attacking the way that many individuals choose to incorporate raw foods in their life. I like a young coconut and a raw flax cracker as much as the next person. But when it comes to incorporating raw food in my diet, I prefer to take a more simplistic, more local approach. I am privileged enough to choose the foods I eat each day, and I want to make sure that my choices support my health, my local economy, my values, and the overall well-being of the individuals, animals, and land that produced them, whether I'm making a raw vegan meal or roasting a brisket. Simple salads and slaws, raw cultured vegetables and sauerkraut, smoothies, fresh green juices, sprouted chickpeas and homemade broccoli sprouts - these are my favorite way to eat raw foods.  I eat raw foods most in the spring and summer, when produce is fresh and the temperatures are warm.  In autumn and winter, as temperatures cool and my body needs to expend more energy to stay warm, I stray from eating as many raw foods and incorporate more cooked vegetables.  I find I feel best when I connect my dietary choices to the season, so that's what I do.

As a smoothie addict and lover of salads, my excitement for warmer weather - and all the food that goes with it - is pretty intense. 


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Click to read more ...

Tuesday
Apr052011

April SOS Kitchen Challenge Reveal

 

It's April--which means the cruelest month   love is in the air  an entire month dedicated to the celebration of my birthday  another SOS Kitchen Challenge!

This month, with so many of us thinking about spring and green shoots finally making their way toward the sky, Ricki and I have chosen an ingredient that is itself a harbinger of spring.  With its lively green hue and tender, pine cone-like tops, this veggie is often enjoyed even by those who don't otherwise consume many veggies.  Our happy ingredient this month happens to be...

ASPARAGUS!

When asparagus hits the grocery stores and markets around this part of the world, we know spring is just around the corner. And who doesn't love spring? 

Available in most places from April to May (though much earlier in California and much later in the midwest), asparagus is beloved by many as a special treat. Actually part of the Lily family, asparagus is available in three varieties: green (the type with which most people are familiar), white, which is grown underground to inhibit the chlorophyll and thereby prevent any color from developing; and purple, which is much smaller and more delicate than the standard type.  My personal favorite among these is white asparagus, mostly for nostalgic reasons. My first exposure to it was in high school, while on European tour with a youth symphony. My French host family served me pickled white asparagus, and I was in shock! I loved it, but our massive language barrier didn't really allow me to ask much about it. Then, I encountered it a year later, while studying in Salamanca, Spain.  My classmates and I ordered paella, complete with pasty white stalks of asparagus that looked like disembodied fingers sticking out between the rice and mussels. My classmates had no idea what the stuff was. Thankfully, my prior experience with the albino vegetable allowed me to set the record straight (nerd) and we all ate it. Shortly thereafter, I saw it in the grocery store in my hometown of Oshkosh, Wisconsin, and remember feeling very fancy that I could tell my dad all about it. 

Why I remember things like this but forget to pay bills and leave my cell phone all over the place is beyond my comprehension.

Perhaps part of asparagus' elite appeal is the fact that it is more perishable than many other vegetables; it stays fresh only a few days, and, in fact, begins to lose its antioxidant value more quickly than other veggies.  The best way to store asparagus to keep it fresh is to place the cut ends in a little bit of fresh water; I stand my bunch of asparagus upright in an empty (clean) large yogurt container or glass jar, with about an inch (2.5 cm) of water in the bottom.  I invert a plastic veggie bag (usually the one it came in) gently over the spears for storage.  It will keep a couple of days this way.

All three varieties of the vegetable contain compounds called saponins, which have anti-inflammatory properties. It's also one of the few foods that contains inulin, known as a "pre-biotic" because it feeds the healthy bacteria (probiotics) in our intestines, thereby encouraging a healthy digestive tract, immune system, and regular elimination (other sources of inulin are chicory, yacon and both onions and garlic).

With its high fiber content, asparagus is a great aid to digestion.  It's also an excellent source of folic acid and Vitamin K (essential for healthy blood and bones) and is a  good source of other B-vitamins. The high amount of Vitamin A (just 6 spears provide 25% of the daily requirement) is great for healthy skin; and it's also a mild diuretic, which means it can help to reduce swelling or other conditions in which one retains water (such as PMS). Finally, it also helps to detox the body with antioxidants like glutathione (important for liver function). And let's not forget that it tastes delicious and often appeals to folks who don't otherwise enjoy their veggies!

Most of us think of asparagus as a savory ingredient, used in classic dishes like quiche or risotto, above--and of course it's delicious that way! But it's also great shredded, raw, in salads; creamed in soups; or grilled.  And if you can think of a tasty sweet use for this vegetable, you'll get an extra-special mention in this month's SOS Roundup! ;)

How to Participate:  To play along with this month's challenge,  simply cook up a new recipe–either sweet OR savory (or both)–using asparagus. 

Be sure to follow the general SOS guidelines for ingredients and submission requirements (please be sure to read the guidelines before submitting! We hate to remove links, but we will do so if they don't comply with the general guidelines).  You may submit your own recipe or one you found on a website or blog (even one of ours). Then link up your recipe via the linky tool at the bottom of this post, or any of the other SOS: Asparagus posts that I publish this month.  Be sure to also add a link to this page on your post, and if you wish, include the SOS logo. 

Your recipe will be displayed on both Ricki's and my blog via the Linky, and will be featured in a recipe roundup at the end of this month.  As always, we look forward to more of your innovative, delectable, enthusiastic entries this month!

SOS Kitchen Challenge: Asparagus

 

Friday
Feb042011

Gluten-Free, Allergy-Friendly Super Bowl Recipes

Truthfully, I don't really care about football 99.9% of the time.  I don't follow it through the season, I don't like the noisy nature of football games, and I hate the way that people get so worked up over it and scream at the TV. But when the Packers go to the Super Bowl, my loyalties to my home state football team flare up and I feel a little pride.  I suddenly become excited about football.  Yeah, yeah, call me a fair weather fan - I won't deny it.

I saw that a few bloggers had posted healthy Super Bowl recipe posts, so I thought I'd follow suit and post a few ideas for health-conscious, GF, allergy-friendly foods that everyone will enjoy while you cheer on the Packers (or that other team...).  

The irony of all this is I won't be having any kind of Super Bowl party at all! I'm in New York right now for a long weekend, and am flying back on Sunday during the game.  Oh well!

Eat, drink, and be merry!  

Munchies

Crackers and Dips

Soups

Burgers & Meatballs

Yeast-Free Pumpkinseed Teff Sandwich Bread (GF, vegan, ACD) 

Carb-Feast

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Crave-worth Vegetables and Salads

Cashnana Cookies

Sweets

 

You can find more great gluten-free Super Bowl recipes from Ali at Whole Life Nutrition Kitchen,  Diane at The Whole Gang and Elana at Elana's Pantry

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